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When Company Time and Personal Time Collide

If you’re reading this at work, you might be putting your job at risk. Or not.

Recently, a New York City administrative law judge declined to support the city’s Department of Education to fire an employee for surfing the Web on company time. “It should be observed,” Judge John B. Spooner wrote, “that the Internet has become the modern equivalent of a telephone or a daily newspaper, providing a combination of communication and information that most employees use as frequently in their personal lives as for their work.”

This case further highlights the growing ambiguity of what constitutes “company time” or a “work day.” In today’s always-on business world, many knowledge workers work after hours, whether at home or on the road. Employers don’t complain about that — and in some cases it’s an expectation — so why should they quibble if workers use time during the workday for personal tasks? Progressive, enlightened employers don’t, recognizing the increased blurring of the work and personal spaces. Adding fuel to the controversy are studies suggesting that employees who work from home spend almost twice as much time using the Internet for work use after hours than using it for personal use during work hours.

Ultimately, we may move toward a work model in which much employee pay is based on output of work, rather than hours spent or the “bucket” in which those hours are contained.

Source: Washington Post

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Via FutureWire – futurism and emerging technology

Nepali photoblog with protest reports: Phalano.com

Xeni Jardin:


The photoblog Phalano.com is publishing many images each day from the ongoing demonstrations in Nepal. A post from Saturday describes a “sea of protestors” flooding Kathmandu, on the seventeenth day of a nationwide general strike.

Shown here, at left (link to source, shot by Shanker Kharel), this demonstrator has shaved a message into his head. I can’t read it, but would welcome a translation from a BoingBoing reader. At right (link to source, shot by Chandra Sekhar Karki) police in Kathmandu beat a protestor with sticks.

The government has imposed a mandatory curfew in Kathmandu. A site admin’s message on Phalano.com asks for reader forgiveness over resulting technical difficulties: “We are currently unable to upload your comments due to curfew… we apologize for this!”

Reader comment: Anonymous says,

You asked for a translation of “Loktantra”. The Nepali language used “Prajatantra” to mean “democracy”. “Praja” means “subjects” (of a King or monarch), so “Prajatantra” actually means “the rule of subjects”, which obviously is unsatisfactory. So the new term “Loktantra” was coined. “Lok” means “folk” – so “Loktantra” would be full democracy, as opposed to a half-hearted version.

Recovery Happens

zoriah_thailand.jpgIn the immediate aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami, we pointed to satellite photos showing the before-and-after of coastal regions of Thailand, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India and other affected locations. These images were among the most powerful representations of the disaster, as viewers could easily trace the path of destruction. New before-and-after images are now available, but these tell a very different story.

Photojournalist Zoriah covered both Sri Lanka and Thailand in the days following the tsunami; earlier this year, Zoriah returned to Thailand, and took pictures at the exact same sets of locations. WarShooter.com, a web portal for photojournalists covering conflict and disaster, posted the resulting side-by-side comparison this weekend. Some of the changes are subtle, but it’s clear that much of Thailand is well on the road to recovery.

John Stanmeyer also posted before-and-after shots, this time of Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh still has much further to go than Thailand, but these images stand as record that human beings can, and will, choose to survive and flourish even in the wake of unthinkable disaster. (Warning: the first image of Stanmeyer’s collection includes a fully-visible corpse; the subsequent images aren’t nearly as disturbing.)

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in The Means of Expression – Media, Creativity and Experience at 12:12 PM)

Recovery Happens

zoriah_thailand.jpgIn the immediate aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami, we pointed to satellite photos showing the before-and-after of coastal regions of Thailand, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India and other affected locations. These images were among the most powerful representations of the disaster, as viewers could easily trace the path of destruction. New before-and-after images are now available, but these tell a very different story.

Photojournalist Zoriah covered both Sri Lanka and Thailand in the days following the tsunami; earlier this year, Zoriah returned to Thailand, and took pictures at the exact same sets of locations. WarShooter.com, a web portal for photojournalists covering conflict and disaster, posted the resulting side-by-side comparison this weekend. Some of the changes are subtle, but it’s clear that much of Thailand is well on the road to recovery.

John Stanmeyer also posted before-and-after shots, this time of Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh still has much further to go than Thailand, but these images stand as record that human beings can, and will, choose to survive and flourish even in the wake of unthinkable disaster. (Warning: the first image of Stanmeyer’s collection includes a fully-visible corpse; the subsequent images aren’t nearly as disturbing.)

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in The Means of Expression – Media, Creativity and Experience at 12:12 PM)

Thailand: huge anti-gov demonstrations, media largely silent

Xeni Jardin:



BoingBoing reader Jit in Thailand says,

Thai television has been notorious for remaining silent when historic events are happening.

Right now history is happening — a mob is marching on Government House with the intent to overthrow the Thaksin administration.

What is Thai broadcast television showing? This.

Full coverage of the recent unrest is here — this is what blogs are for!

post about today’s demonstrations, full blog-coverage here.

Thailand: huge anti-gov demonstrations, media largely silent

Xeni Jardin:



BoingBoing reader Jit in Thailand says,

Thai television has been notorious for remaining silent when historic events are happening.

Right now history is happening — a mob is marching on Government House with the intent to overthrow the Thaksin administration.

What is Thai broadcast television showing? This.

Full coverage of the recent unrest is here — this is what blogs are for!

post about today’s demonstrations, full blog-coverage here.

Cycling ’74 Relaunches Site, Forum; Max/MSP Knowledge Thrives

Looking for new wisdom and expertise on tools like the insanely deep Max/MSP/Jitter? (If you’re using Max, signs point to yes.) Cycling ’74 relaunched their site (http://www.cycling74.com/) a couple of weeks ago, incorporating a variety of features that make this an indispensible resource for users of Max and other products. Since late last month, the new site has gotten rolling fast. Collective intelligence, meet Max.

Originally posted by Administrator from createdigitalmusic.com, ReBlogged by daniel perlin on Feb 11, 2006 at 01:04 AM

Abolishing the penal code

gregge%20di%20pecore.jpg
If this Government lasts a few more months it will abolish the penal code.
It’s latest exploit is the “Pecorella law” just approved in Parliament.
The law establishes that if a defendant is found not guilty, the prosecution cannot appeal but can only take the case to the Court of Cassazione.
A defendant who has been found guilty, however, has the right to appeal and if the appeal fails, to also go to the Court of Cassazione. The limitation of the powers of the prosecutor is a grave violation of the equality of powers of people taking on different roles in a trial, as established by the Constitution.

Continue reading…

Addio, Dolce vita

For all its attractions, Italy is caught in a long, slow decline. Reversing it will take more courage than its present political leaders seem able to muster, says John Peet
(interviewed here http://www.economist.com/world/europe/displaystory.cfm?story_id=5164061)
From The Economist print edition
on 24th Nov 2005

Continue reading…



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