THURS-DAY-NIGHT

Happily in the wrong place.
Giulia
If there was one thing our fabricanti were not expecting to be confronted by on their way down to the cinema after a hard days writing, drawing, filming, designing, playing, planning and researching last Thursday evening, it was probably semiotic formulations expressing the science behind language codes. “But Giulia’s in graphic design right?” comes a querying whisper. Giulia is indeed in the graphic design department, Visual Communication to be precise. However, as these presentations constantly reveal, Fabrica’s fabricanti have many unexpected cards up their colourful sleeves. Miss Giulia De Meo is of course no exception to this and her card of choice this particular Thurs-Day-Night was Semiotics.
Like Alice herself, we were taken on an unexpected journey through this wonderland of coded meaning and diverse understanding. From Charles Sanders Pierce to Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (himself coded by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll) and his ‘racist flowers’, who fail to break their thought structure so as to understand Alice in the context of Wonderland, as anything other than an ugly plant; to Sherlock Holmes who solved crimes by combining imagination and logic and breaking out of common thought structures; to the history of the Christian Church; to Micheal Gondry’s ‘Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind’ which encourages us to break our thought structures and “take me somewhere where I don’t belong, where we can hide”; to Radiohead’s ‘Everything is its right place’, live in London. Here Giulia brought together the various elements she had discussed during the presentation to show how the same logical semiotic theories and philosophies are found in film, music, literature, design and indeed anything that questions the set thought structures which determine how we approach and interpret
‘everything’ and it’s ‘right place’ in the world around us.
Whether “semiotics will make you crazy” as Giulia jokes, is yet to be seen, but it certainly sent us away feeling that maybe we’re all quite “happily, in the wrong place”.